Memphis Offers Grants for Public Infrastructure Enhancements

Dec 13

Memphis Offers Grants for Public Infrastructure Enhancements

The city of Memphis is currently supporting a multi-million dollar investment in public infrastructure, most recently involving St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The state will use the funding to improve the public infrastructure surrounding the St. Jude campus in downtown Memphis. The initiative is also intended to spur economic growth, leading to more jobs for the residents of the city. The infrastructure investments will benefit not only St. Jude, but all of the surrounding areas. The expansion project is expected to be advantageous to clinical care and research programs and will be part of a six-year strategic plan. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital opened more than 50 years ago and treats patients from all 50 states and around the world. The enhancements are being funded through the Fast Track Infrastructure Development Program (FIDP). This program assists in the funding of local governments in providing public infrastructure to support new or expanding industry. There are several organizations that qualify for such grants, including water systems, wastewater systems, and site improvement, as well as other public infrastructure improvements required to support economic growth. Grants are typically limited up to a maximum of $750,000 with amounts determined for individual projects. To date, the expansion projects include over a billion in both new capital investment and additional operational expenditure over the life of the six-year plan. This total is designated for use in additional strategic investment specifically for Memphis. Fun Fact: Memphis has several parks- Mudd Island being arguably the most unique of the city’s parks. It’s located on a 50-acre island in the Mississippi River. The park is open seasonally and will re-open in April. When you go be sure to visit the Riverwalk where you’ll find concrete sections which were installed and positioned to allow the water to flow from north to...

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Plumbing Guidelines in Memphis: Your Best Defense

May 18

Plumbing Guidelines in Memphis: Your Best Defense

When looking for a plumber in Memphis, it’s important to know that there are guidelines to be followed by the International Plumbing Code (IPC). The IPC sets minimum regulations for plumbing systems using both prescriptive and performance-related provisions covering topics such as backflow prevention, fixtures & fittings, water supply and distribution piping, storm drainage and non-potable water systems (rainwater, gray water, reclaimed water) and more. No matter how small the job, it’s a good idea to know the right questions to ask to ensure the best, most professional service.  In some cases, homeowners can incur fines for having faulty plumbing installed, and selling a house with plumbing that doesn’t stand up to code will cause major issues. Are you insured? Your plumber must have insurance to cover the cost of any direct or ancillary damages that may occur while repairs are being made. Critically, this insurance must also cover potential injuries while working on your home so you are clear of all responsibility. Another question might be how do you diagnose the problem? Some repairs are easy to diagnose with a quick visual inspection or even over the phone. For less obvious problems they will need skill and proper tools to get to the root of the issue. Do they have pipe inspection cameras that allow them to peer into pipes for a speedy diagnosis? Do they have a checklist to diagnose all potential problems? Starting work without a full picture of the problem can lead to more costs down the road. If a pipeline breaks, is leaking or clogged, a homeowner’s best defense will be to use local, licensed contractors who are familiar with City codes and can ensure a timely resolution to the issue. Perma-Liner Industries will always refer you to the most reputable, certified and highly qualified plumber right where you live. Don’t hesitate to call us so we can offer you our best! 1-866-336-2568 or go online to...

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Broken Sewer Line Advisories for Memphis

Apr 26

Broken Sewer Line Advisories for Memphis

The city of Memphis has had unfortunate instances of sewer overflows this month.  This week there were reports of another overspill occurrence which discharged approximately 1 million gallons/a day of wastewater into the Mississippi River tributary.  Workers contained the area and made emergency repairs to prevent further leakage. Although water quality testing is being performed to ensure safety, the city advises caution and avoidance of the Loosahatchie, the river that flows into the Mississippi. The break in the 42-inch sewer line occurred when nearby soil eroded and gave way due to heavy rains. The pipe was inspected several months ago without incident. Last month, another collapse occurred involving a 96-inch pipeline, which resulted in 50 million gallons of sewage per day into Cypress Creek and adjoining McKellar Lake. Similarly, these waterways also flow into the Mississippi River. The soil erosion and embankment failure are largely attributed to the record amounts of rainfall that the city sustained in March, also accounting for the most recent overflow. The city inspects sewer lines twice a year but due to the recent line breaks, the city is planning a more extensive examination of the lines in order to identify a need to address additional drawbacks. The city has 3,200 miles of underground sewer pipes and recently put into effect mandated improvements to the sewer system. Due to years of disrepair, Memphis is in the process of implementing a sure-fire approach to handling the dilemma of overflows. The cost of this rehabilitation will be approximately $250...

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The City of Franklin’s Stormwater and Erosion Origins

Nov 25

The City of Franklin’s Stormwater and Erosion Origins

Pollution entering Franklin’s streams and channels has many sources and entry paths. Pollutants are generally either washed into surface waters by rainfall runoff or they enter through human activities such as connecting non-storm water drains to the storm water drainage system or by someone dumping waste into drains or streams directly. Franklin has programs of education, prevention and inspection to address these environmental concerns. Rainfall induced pollution enters primarily by two methods. The first is erosion and sedimentation of sediment and the pollutants sediment contains. The second is the simple wash off of pollution that may lie on paved surfaces. There are negative influences on channels, streams and rivers when sediment enters the waterways. As sediment volumes increase in waterways, the overall capacity decreases. This causes an increase in flooding as well as creates excessive maintenance needs. There are different types of erosion that are also cause for concern, such as water and wind erosion. Construction activities often require the disturbance of streams and channels. Once vegetation or other bank protection measures are disturbed, flows may begin to erode the unprotected soil. Dust is a common concern from construction sites and originates as inorganic particle pollution from rock and soil surfaces and material storage piles. The majority of dust generated and emitted into the air at a construction site is related to earth moving operations, demolition, construction traffic on unpaved surfaces, and wind over disturbed soil surfaces.  There are five primary factors that influence erosion: soil characteristics, vegetative cover, topography, climate, and rainfall. Memphis, looking for a highly recommended plumber?  Perma-Liner Industries has partnered with the most knowledgeable plumbers in your area to provide you with outstanding service.  We provide only the best referrals for licensed and certified professionals.  Call us or go online to see how we can help.  1-866-336-2568 or www.perma-liner.com The City of Franklin’s Stormwater and Erosion...

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Fairfield Glade Updates Sewers to Drip Dispersal Method

Nov 03

Fairfield Glade Updates Sewers to Drip Dispersal Method

Fairfield Glade Community is updating their Wastewater treatment system.  The community is full of multiple amenities including lakes and golf courses, and lies between Knoxville and Nashville, within the city limits of Crossville. Since development began in 1970, the community has been served by a private water district and a private wastewater treatment system fed by gravity and low-pressure sewers. The original treatment plant, about 7 miles from the southernmost point of the development, used an extended aeration process and discharged to a stream called Bagwell Branch. After approximately 25 years of use, that system had become obsolete and undersized. It was then replaced by the lagoon system with 2.9 mgd design capacity and 0.86 mgd average flow.  When the functioning of older systems became inadequate, the city devised an alternate dispersal method and has integrated the use of drip dispersal system pumps. The technology was developed for large agricultural irrigation projects and has been widely used with wastewater applications such as small commercial and housing clusters. The community’s total 16,000 building sites include about 10,000 still available. About 100 new homes recently started construction in both, and building continues. That means growth ahead for the treatment plant and its drip irrigation system. The city of Memphis is also planning significant rehabilitations to their sewer system.  Staring this year, there will be a 4 year Capital Improvement Program (CIP), which is  intended to be a multi-year plan for capital expenditures to replace and expand the City’s infrastructure, vehicles and equipment. For program purposes the City defines a capital improvement as a major improvement or acquisition costing over $50,000 that will last 10 years or more. The program is updated annually to reflect the latest priorities, updated cost estimates and available revenue...

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Memphis’ Smart Sewer Assessment Agenda

Oct 16

Memphis’ Smart Sewer Assessment Agenda

Memphis has initiated a clever assessment program to help residents and their aging sewer structures. It’s called SARP10 (Sewer Assessment and Rehabilitation Program).  It is an initiative that will bring improvements to the sanitary sewer system in the City of Memphis over the next 10 years. The SARP10 team will implement the program through a series of condition assessment and construction rehabilitation projects over the life of the program. The first portion of the project consisted of two Pilot Areas in which condition and assessment work began in November 2013, followed by Phase 1 work which was completed in February 2015. Phase 2 work started January 2015 and was scheduled to be completed in August 2015. The program will move from neighborhood to neighborhood until the entire sanitary sewer system within the City of Memphis has been assessed. The City of Memphis, like a lot of cities across the nation, has an aging wastewater collection and transmission system (WCTS). This WCTS consists mostly of buried pipes, concrete manholes for maintenance access, and pumping stations with pressure force mains. Over time pipes deteriorate, joints break apart, roots penetrate pipes, corrosion causes pipes and manholes to degrade and/or oil and grease can clog the sewer. As a result, the City could experience line stoppages that in turn result in sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). The City negotiated an agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) to implement an assessment and rehabilitation program with the objective to eliminate SSOs. This agreement was finalized in a Consent Decree on September 20, 2012. The City of Memphis is legally obligated to implement this program and over the next 10 years is expected to spend approximately...

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