Memphis Sustains Recent Sewer Spills- In the Midst of Repairs

Jun 23

Memphis Sustains Recent Sewer Spills- In the Midst of Repairs

The city of Memphis continues the repair of the sewer line rupture that dumped at least 350 million gallons of raw sewage into McKellar Lake this spring. The repair began with a 96-inch-diameter line that gave way just months ago. While McKellar Lake has reopened as of last month, repairs to the faulty line are ongoing. The process will include the construction and operation of a temporary bypass route and conducting cleanup activities. The project will take several months to complete and will be funded through the city’s sewer fund; which gets revenues through customers’ fees. The pipeline, which carried wastewater, failed after heavy rains gradually wore away at the soil beneath it. The rupture discharged up to 50 million gallons of sewage a day into Cypress Creek. The creek is located in Southwest Memphis and empties into the Mississippi River. The recent sewage spill was the largest of three reported by the city in a three-week period.  An additional leak was also discovered in an area nearby when crews found that part of a 42-inch pipe in the area had collapsed into the Loosahatchie River, after the bank in which it was buried caved into the river. The 60-inch line will also require long-term repairs. Interesting fact: Memphis and communities across Tennessee will begin using smart meters and benefiting from efficient utility service which will create enhanced payment options and increased customer savings. Customers will benefit by having access to more data regarding energy consumption, and resources to help better manage usage. Memphis Light Gas & Water is the largest three-service public utility in the United States, with more than 1 million utility meters. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a Trenchless Tour on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay tuned!  Click Here to...

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Broken Sewer Line Advisories for Memphis

Apr 26

Broken Sewer Line Advisories for Memphis

The city of Memphis has had unfortunate instances of sewer overflows this month.  This week there were reports of another overspill occurrence which discharged approximately 1 million gallons/a day of wastewater into the Mississippi River tributary.  Workers contained the area and made emergency repairs to prevent further leakage. Although water quality testing is being performed to ensure safety, the city advises caution and avoidance of the Loosahatchie, the river that flows into the Mississippi. The break in the 42-inch sewer line occurred when nearby soil eroded and gave way due to heavy rains. The pipe was inspected several months ago without incident. Last month, another collapse occurred involving a 96-inch pipeline, which resulted in 50 million gallons of sewage per day into Cypress Creek and adjoining McKellar Lake. Similarly, these waterways also flow into the Mississippi River. The soil erosion and embankment failure are largely attributed to the record amounts of rainfall that the city sustained in March, also accounting for the most recent overflow. The city inspects sewer lines twice a year but due to the recent line breaks, the city is planning a more extensive examination of the lines in order to identify a need to address additional drawbacks. The city has 3,200 miles of underground sewer pipes and recently put into effect mandated improvements to the sewer system. Due to years of disrepair, Memphis is in the process of implementing a sure-fire approach to handling the dilemma of overflows. The cost of this rehabilitation will be approximately $250...

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Memphis: Flooding Induced Sewer Spill

Apr 12

Memphis: Flooding Induced Sewer Spill

Rain and flooding have been significantly impacting the Memphis-area. The city has been working to make sure storm water drains are clear of debris and surrounding areas are safe.  The severe storms, of late, have also been the cause of reported potholes, further impacting road conditions. Additionally, crews have focused their attention on repairs to a sewage line rupture which is the cause of untreated wastewater in the Mississippi River tributary.  There is currently no health advisory attached to the spill. However, it is thought to be a threat to wildlife and anyone who touches the water or eats fish from it.  A bypass around the damaged section of line has been put in place. The leak in the 96-inch sewer line began when ground under the pipe gave way because of heavy rain. In addition to monitoring the situation, federal environmental officials informed regions downstream about the spill. The quality of the sewer system is being examined in greater detail to ensure stability and prevent future hazards. The city has agreed to make improvements to its sewer systems to eliminate unauthorized overflows of untreated raw sewage, with an estimated cost of approximately $250 million. In other nearby cities, flood waters and drainage control problems have been an equal concern, prompting residents to look up FEMA floodplain maps to see their home’s location and where it lands. Save the Dates: Perma-Liner Industries has a lineup of events for you to attend!  All are invited to come to one, or if you’re adventurous, all of our LIVE DEMOS coming up in April and May. You can go to www.perma-liner.com to register and find out more but first…here are the dates and locations to save: We’ll be in Seattle April 27th, Chicago May 4th and Philadelphia May 18th. You can expect to have our knowledgeable staff showing you the latest CIPP technology. We want to see you...

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The City of Franklin’s Stormwater and Erosion Origins

Nov 25

The City of Franklin’s Stormwater and Erosion Origins

Pollution entering Franklin’s streams and channels has many sources and entry paths. Pollutants are generally either washed into surface waters by rainfall runoff or they enter through human activities such as connecting non-storm water drains to the storm water drainage system or by someone dumping waste into drains or streams directly. Franklin has programs of education, prevention and inspection to address these environmental concerns. Rainfall induced pollution enters primarily by two methods. The first is erosion and sedimentation of sediment and the pollutants sediment contains. The second is the simple wash off of pollution that may lie on paved surfaces. There are negative influences on channels, streams and rivers when sediment enters the waterways. As sediment volumes increase in waterways, the overall capacity decreases. This causes an increase in flooding as well as creates excessive maintenance needs. There are different types of erosion that are also cause for concern, such as water and wind erosion. Construction activities often require the disturbance of streams and channels. Once vegetation or other bank protection measures are disturbed, flows may begin to erode the unprotected soil. Dust is a common concern from construction sites and originates as inorganic particle pollution from rock and soil surfaces and material storage piles. The majority of dust generated and emitted into the air at a construction site is related to earth moving operations, demolition, construction traffic on unpaved surfaces, and wind over disturbed soil surfaces.  There are five primary factors that influence erosion: soil characteristics, vegetative cover, topography, climate, and rainfall. Memphis, looking for a highly recommended plumber?  Perma-Liner Industries has partnered with the most knowledgeable plumbers in your area to provide you with outstanding service.  We provide only the best referrals for licensed and certified professionals.  Call us or go online to see how we can help.  1-866-336-2568 or www.perma-liner.com The City of Franklin’s Stormwater and Erosion...

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Rehabilitating the Memphis Sewer System, Proactively

Oct 02

Rehabilitating the Memphis Sewer System, Proactively

Memphis has entered into a consent decree that requires assessments of the sewer system.  The City is doing all it needs to do in order to clean up the sanitary sewers in neighborhoods.  The outline for the overhaul is to focus on repairing the sewer lines and manholes.  Areas of Midtown, downtown, and Hickory Hill will all be included in what’s being called SARP10 for the Sewer Assessment and Rehabilitation Program.  The project is estimated to cost $250 million and will take nearly a decade to complete.  This initiative is expected to go a long way in eliminating the multiple sanitary sewer overflows, as well as, minimizing breaks in the pipelines. The basic premise for the city’s sewer system dates back to the late 1870s, following the Yellow Fever epidemic that killed 5,000 Memphians. That’s when George Waring, Jr., a drainage engineer for New York’s Central Park, developed a state-of-the-art (for the time) system that separated the sanitary system from the storm water. Most of the original system was made from wooden pipes, although, almost all of those have been replaced over the years. So far, only one wooden pipe was discovered during the assessment.  The City also plans to solicit the help of volunteers to inform residents of various tests that will be performed to ensure the pipelines are intact and free from leaks or if there is evidence of a pipeline in need of repair. Memphis, looking for a highly recommended plumber?  Perma-Liner Industries has partnered with the best plumbers in your area to provide you with outstanding service.  We provide only the best referrals for licensed and certified professionals.  Call us or go online to see how we can help.  1-866-336-2568 or...

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